one book read valley view how not to die michael greger author event

To reserve a seat for Dr. Greger’s presentation, please email OneBook@vvh.org with your first and last name and phone number.

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JOIN!

  • Borrow the book from the Connie Delaney Medical Library, “How Not to Die” by Michael Greger, MD.
michael greger md author event valley view hospital

READ!

  • This community reading club is for anyone who wants to read and have conversations about health, diet and lifestyle choices. Follow the weekly online reading plan right here!
Valley VIew's OneBook is a community-wide reading program featuring the national bestseller, How Not to Die by Michael Greger, MD. Author event Feb 9,2017

ATTEND!

  • Meet Dr. Greger to learn new insights, ask questions on February 9, 2017, at the Orchard Gathering Center.

Answer to last week’s question of the week: What can you eat to avoid muscle soreness from exercise? “…eating blueberries, for example, can significantly reduce exercise-induced imflammation. Studies using cherries show that this anti-inflammatory effect can translate into faster recovery time, … Eating two cups of watermelon prior to intense physical activity was also found to significantly reduce muscle soreness.” Pg. 396

From Part 2, Read Conclusion, Acknowledgements, Appendix


Answer to last week’s question of the week: People who eat what food appear to have a significantly lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease? “…a Harvard University study of about 130,000 people found that people who eat more berries do indeed appear to have a significantly lower risk of developing the disease [Parkinson’s].” Pg. 236

From Part 1, Read Chapter 15 How Not to Die from Iatrogenic Causes

From Part 2, Read Exercise


Answer to last week’s question of the week: What’s the connection between coffee drinking and suicide risk?! “…people who drank two or more cups of coffee daily appeared to have about only half the suicide risk compared to non-coffee drinkers… people who drank more than six cups a day were 80 percent less likely to commit suicide, though drinking eight or more cups a day has been associated with increased suicide risk.” Pg. 206

From Part 1, Read Chapter 14 How Not to Die from Parkinson’s Disease

From Part 2, Read Beverages


Answer to last week’s question of the week: What’s so special about the spice turmeric?! Answer: “…curcumin, the pigment in turmeric that gives it that bright yellow color… may play a role in preventing or treating lung disease, brain disease, and a variety of cancers, including multiple myeloma, colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer. But curcumin has also been shown to help speed recovery after surgery and effectively treat rheumatoid arthritis…” pg. 351

From Part 1, Read Chapter 12 How Not to Die from Suicidal Depression

From Part 1, Read Chapter 13 How Not to Die from Prostate Cancer

From Part 2, Read Whole Grains


Answer to last week’s question: Why might animal protein be so detrimental to kidney function? “Another reason animal protein may be so detrimental to kidney function is that it is generally more acid forming. …animal protein tends to have higher levels of sulfur-containing amino acids, such as methionine, which produce sulfuric acid when metabolized in the body.” pg. 168

From Part 1, Read Chapter 11 How Not to Die from Breast Cancer

From Part 2, Read Nuts and Seeds

FFrom Part 2, Read Herbs and Spices


Answer to last week’s question: What cooking method produces acrylamide (a probable human carcinogen)?! What cooking method produces acrylamide (a probable human carcinogen)?! “Deep fat fried foods, whether of plant origin (like French fries) or from animals (like fried chicken), have been associated with higher cancer risk. Deep-frying leads to the production of dangerous heterocyclic amines in meat… and to acrylamide in deep-fried plant foods.” pg. 333

From Part 1, Read Chapter 9 How Not to Die from Blood Cancers

From Part 1, Read Chapter 10 How Not to Die from Kidney Disease

From Part 2, Read Flaxseeds



Answer to last week’s question: Eating too much of this substance may kill up to 4 million people in a year. “The two most prominent dietary risks for death and disability in the world may be not eating enough fruit and eating too much salt. Nearly five million people appear to die every year as a result of not eating enough fruit, while eating too much salt may kill up to four million.” pg. 124

It’s the last week of a lighter reading load

From Part 1, Read Chapter 8 How Not to Die from Liver Diseases

From Part 2, Read Other Vegetables


Answer to last week’s question What is so special about broccoli?! “the component responsible… is thought to be sulforaphane, which is formed almost exclusively in cruciferous vegetables. Beyond a promising anticancer agent, sulforaphane may also help protect your brain, and your eyesight, reduce nasal inflammation, manage type 2 diabetes…” pg 305

A lighter reading load continues for the holidays.

From Part 1, Read Chapter 7 How Not to Die from High Blood Pressure

From Part 2, Read Greens


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Answer to last week’s question Which body organ has the greatest exposure to the outside world? “Counting all the little folds, some scientists estimate the your gut would blanket thousands of square feet, vastly more expansive than your skin and lungs combined. What you eat may very well be your primary interface with the outside world.” pg 62

Let’s lighten our reading load a bit… the HOLIDAYS are approaching!

From Part 1, Read Chapter 6 How Not to Die from Diabetes

From Part 2, Read Cruciferous Vegetables


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Answer to last week’s question, Which berry has the highest concentrations of melatonin? “Goji berries, however, have the highest concentrations of melatonin.” pg 293

From Part 1, read Chapter 4 How Not to Die from Digestive Cancers

From Part 1, Read Chapter 5 How Not to Die from Infections

From Part 2, read Other Fruits


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Answer to last week’s question, What is the “Tomato Effect?”

“The term was coined in the Journal of the American Medical Association in reference to the fact that tomatoes were once considered poisonous and were shunned for centuries in North America, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.” “…example of the medical establishment rejecting sound science when it goes against the prevailing conventional wisdom.” pg 28

From Part 1, read Chapter 3 How Not to Die from Brain Diseases

From Part 2 read Beans

From Part 2 read Berries


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The answer to last week’s question, What is lifestyle medicine and who benefits from it?

“…healthy lifestyle factors can have a strong impact on the prevention of chronic diseases: not smoking, not being obese, getting a half-hour of exercise a day, and eating healthier –” pg 6 “Most doctor visits are for life-style based diseases, which means they’re preventable diseases.” pg 10

“No one profits from lifestyle medicine (other than the patient!)… there is one corporate sector that actually benefits from keeping people healthy – namely, the insurance industry.” pg. 11

From Part 1, read Chapter 1 How Not to Die from Heart Disease

From Part 1, read Chapter 2 How Not to Die from Lung Diseases

These links are of interest, too: Ahhh… the smell of frying bacon?! Really?!
Broccoli stops lung cancer growth?


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It’s time to read! But don’t worry if you still don’t have your book; you won’t have any problem catching up!

Explore the book contents. There are two parts: the first part has chapters about specific conditions which is what Dr. Greger calls the “Why,” and the second part is Dr. Greger’s “Daily Dozen” which is the “How.”

Flip to the back…Whoa! See all those references? Over 120 pages worth?! Those article citations are clinical studies and the “evidence” to support claims. Dr. Greger will sometimes comment on what makes some studies better than others. Clinical studies take different forms. This link explains the different levels of clinical studies: http://guides.mclibrary.duke.edu/c.php?g=158201&p=1036068

Read the Preface, Introduction for Part 1, Introduction for Part 2 and the short chapter titled, “Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen.”

Check out the Daily Dozen App on iTunes or Daily Dozen App on Google Play


Our 15 weeks of Wednesdays postings will guide you through reading the book in a different way and provide video weblinks to support your reading. Why did Michael Greger become a doctor and write this book?!


Through the Connie Delaney Medical Library sponsored by the Valley View Foundation

For questions, contact OneBook@vvh.org